Carnival & Festivals – Daytours4u http://www.daytours4u.com/en Tours, activities and travel tips in South America Mon, 18 Jun 2018 13:16:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.8 96832869 What to Eat & Drink on Christmas in Argentina http://www.daytours4u.com/en/argentina4u/what-to-eat-drink-on-christmas-in-argentina/ Fri, 16 Dec 2016 09:00:07 +0000 http://argentina4u.com/blog/en/?p=1811 Planning a trip to Argentina for the Christmas holidays? Get in the festive spirit with our list of what to eat and drink on Christmas in Argentina.

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If you’re looking to spend the Christmas holidays in Argentina, be sure to eat your heart out in true Argentinian style! Besides the traditional asado, there are a number of mouth-watering dishes to be enjoyed on the Christmas table, so get in the festive spirit now with our list of what to eat to and drink on Christmas in Argentina.

Christmas in ArgentinaVitel Thoné is a Christmas tradition from Argentina’s Italian heritage / Image Source

From Italy to Argentina: Vitel Thoné

What is probably Argentina’s most typical holiday platter happens to be an imported recipe from ItalyVitel thoné is a cold dish consisting of sliced veal covered in a sauce made from anchovies, tuna, mayonnaise, cream and capers.

Although veal is hard to find in Argentina most of the year, the supermarkets have plenty in stock around Christmas time so why not get shopping and try preparing this unique dish yourself? Find the vitel thoné recipe here.

Ninos Envueltos: An Argentine Favourite

Ninos envueltos is an Argentine favourite, which means that it is of course a meat feast. To make ninos envueltos, you stuff three strips of steak with minced meat, spices, chopped onion and hard-boiled egg, then shape the strips into rolls before cooking them until they are juicy and tender – mmm!

Christmas in ArgentinaVegetarians can enjoy dishes like Tomates Rellenos – Stuffed tomatoes / Image Source

Pionno Arrollado & Tomates Rellenos: Vegetarian options

Although most Argentinians are devout meat eaters, it is possible to enjoy a variety of vegetarian dishes on Christmas in Argentina. One option is pionono arrollado; a thin rectangular yellow sponge cake that is rolled up into a log form and filled with ingredients such as lettuce, cheese, tomato, olives and roasted red peppers.

Another option is tomates rellenos (stuffed tomatoes) which simply involves hallowing out tomatoes and stuffing them with a rice mixture, then either baking them or serving them raw.

Ananá Fizz: The Traditional Argentinian Christmas drink

As well as a selection of fine Argentinian wine, you will have the chance to try an Ananá Fizz (or 2/3/4…), the traditional Argentinian Christmas Drink made from cider and pineapple juice. Although it can be purchased readymade for very little money, we’d advise you to avoid buying bottles in supermarkets and make your own instead, using better quality alcohol.

You simple need to pulp some pineapple, add lemon juice and a sprinkle of sugar to your choice of sparkling wine and there you have it, a tasty Christmas cocktail that (hopefully) won’t leave you with a pounding head in the morning!

Christmas in ArgentinaTurron makes the perfect sweet treat after a big Christmas meal / Image Source

Sweet treats: For the Sugar Lovers

Desserts at Christmas in Argentina usually consist of regional delicacies such as turrón, an ultra-sweet treat composed of nougat, peanuts and honey, or panettone, another European import that has become a staple among Argentina’s festive dishes. This sweet bread filled with raisins and dried fruit is the perfect complement to the sweet cider brought out at midnight on Christmas Eve.

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For more information on where to spend your Christmas in Argentina, or to book tours and activities, visit our website.

By: Daytours4u Content Team

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The Best Restaurants to Spend New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/best-restaurants-to-spend-new-years-eve-in-buenos-aires/ Tue, 06 Dec 2016 09:00:09 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/?p=2692 Looking for a place to bring in 2017 in Buenos Aires? Here are our pick of the top six restaurants to wine and dine on New Year’s Eve.

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In addition to the tango houses, another way to spend New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires is to book a dinner at one of the many restaurants that open their doors with a special menu for this particular night. Based on Guia Óleo‘s list of restaurants that are open on December 31st, we’ve selected the 5 best places to have dinner and welcome in the new year.

New Year's Eve in Buenos AiresPuerto Cristal is the perfect setting for a New Year’s Eve dinner with family / Image Source

1) Puerto Cristal (New Year’s Eve Dinner in Puerto Madero)

See in the new year at Puerto Cristal and indulge in an evening of fantastic food and wonderful views. An appetiser full of fresh seafood will be followed by a main course feast, with options including pink salmon, grilled prawns, and pork carré. You’ll also enjoy front row seats for the firework display in Puerto Madero and a live music show. Places here are at a premium, so you need to book in advance.

2) La Parolaccia

With many venues around town, La Parolaccia offers a special menu inspired by traditional gastronomic Italian food. Perfect for celebrating with family. The Palermo chain is located in Av. Cerviño 3561 Esq. Salguero.

3) Campobravo

This restaurant offers a special menu for New Year’s Eve featuring a typical Argentine asado with the best meat, wine, and plenty of dancing. Campobravo has two locations, one being Honduras 5600 and the other Báez 292.

4) Cocu

Cocu usually opens its doors on December 24th, 25th, 31st, and January 1st, with celebrations and an exquisite menu featuring stuffed turkey and a glass of wine from La Bodega Piedras Andinas. For dessert you can sample pan dulce made ​​with brioche dough. Address: Malabia 1510 esq. Gorriti

5) Il Gran Caruso

This traditional restaurant awaits you on the nights of December 24th and 31st with a live show, decorations and a wonderful menu so you can start the year with a bang! Il Gran Caruso is located at El Salvador 5805.

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So, remember to book in advance, and we suggest you choose a party or restaurant near your hotel due to the shortage of taxis and public transport on New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires.

Visit our website to book your day excursions in Buenos Aires or to learn more about the festive period in this wonderful South American capital.

By: Anna Flavia Castro | Translated by: Camilla Day

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Where to Tango on New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/tango-on-new-years-eve-buenos-aires/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 09:00:00 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/2012/11/where-to-tango-on-new-years-eve-in-buenos-aires.html The sensual wonders of tango accompanied by fine cuisine and exquisite wine; find out how you can enjoy a unique New Year's Eve celebration in Buenos Aires.

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Are you travelling to Buenos Aires over New Year? Looking for something special to do on the night of the 31st? Well, in the birthplace of tango, what better way to bring in the New Year than by celebrating and partying the night away at one of Buenos Aires’ spectacular New Year tango shows. Ensuring you kick off 2017 with a truly memorable and authentically porteño night out. But, before we get to the dilemma of which tango show to choose, here’s some general info about New Year’s Eve, or Año Nuevo, in Buenos Aires.

Tango on New Year's EveA New Year’s Eve Tango Show is a special experience / Photo by Luiza Cavalcante

Although the city rightfully deserves its fame as being a party city, New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires is a surprisingly low-key affair, with most porteños spending the countdown to midnight at home with their families before heading out to parties much later on in the night. Others take part in the mass exodus that is customary at the start of the Argentine summer holidays and escape the capital, either crossing the Río de la Plata to Uruguay or migrating to one of Argentina’s beach towns.

This makes Buenos Aires the perfect place for tourists to enjoy New Year’s Eve. It’s not too crowded and even though party fever does eventually hit the city’s street, it’s pleasantly tranquil to start with. However, as with any festivity in big cities, there are a few key things to keep in mind if you’re celebrating New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires:

First of all, don’t rely on public transport or taxis anywhere in the city around midnight. Ensure you get to where you want to be early and don’t expect to get home before 4am.

Prepare to spend a bit more cash: During the holidays, many restaurants, shows, and clubs put their prices up, so don’t expect to be able to do it all on the cheap.

Book ahead! Many restaurants and parties will fill up way in advance – don’t expect to wing it by just dropping in as you’ll risk being disappointed.

img_5776-2Bring in 2017 with a tango show at Cafe de los Angelitos / Photo by Daytours4u

Keeping all these points in mind, one of the most popular and enjoyable ways to celebrate New Year’s Eve in Buenos Aires is with a tango show. Some of Buenos Aires’ best tango houses put on a very special show for the last night of the year – a night of tango extravaganza where you can watch some incredible tango performances, dine in luxury, sip copious amounts of champagne and dance – tango, if you wish – the night away.

These shows on New Year all offer a pick-up service from your hotel and a transfer back from the venue in the wee hours of the morning when you choose to call it a night. The houses also have a fixed rate for the whole night – a higher rate than normal, but at least you know exactly what you’ll be paying at the end of it all. At a New Year’s Eve tango show, you’ll be served a three-course dinner, and free drinks will be flowing all night long. So, no need to worry about booking a table at a restaurant; it’s one table, at one venue for dinner, drinks, entertainment, and a hell of a party to top it off.

img_1904-2A night at Rojo Tango is a night of pure luxury / Photo by Luiza Cavalcante

WHICH NEW YEAR’S EVE TANGO SHOW IS BEST FOR YOU?

Now, there are many Buenos Aires tango houses to choose from and deciding which Tango Show to go for can be daunting. We recommend you have a look at this article we’ve prepared, to give you an initial overview, and then nose around our online catalogue that displays all the possible options.

So, here’s an additional few pointers to help you make your mind up:

El Viejo Almacén in Buenos Aires’ oldest neighbourhood, San Telmo, offers one of the more traditional tango experiences in Buenos Aires, at a par with La Ventana: they both offer high-quality dining with wonderfully authentic performances. For a more fanciful Broadway-style spectacle, we recommend the popular Señor Tango, arguably the most extravagant party in town on New Year’s Eve, while Piazzolla Tango, located in a stunning old theatre, also presents a more modern take on the traditional show.

12Piazzolla Tango is one of the most modern tango spectacles in town / Image Source

Then there’s Esquina Carlos Gardel, in the age-old tango neighbourhood of Abasto, which features one of the most elegant shows with high-tech acoustics and superb dancers. Of the same genre – high-class performances accompanied by 5-star cuisine – you have Madero Tango; a show that comes with the added bonus of being located along the docks of Puerto Madero where the city’s main fireworks display takes place. So, add pyrotechnics to a spectacular, cutting-edge tango show and you have a New Year’s Eve party to remember.

If you’re in for a New Year ’s Eve night of luxury in Buenos Aires, you have multiple options – on the one hand there’s the great-value-for-money Gala Tango (the VIP Lounge of La Ventana Tango) or, if you’re planning an extra special treat on your Buenos Aires vacation, go for a New Year’s Eve celebration at Rojo Tango; without a doubt the most expensive spectacle in the city. Well, a night of luxury never comes cheap, does it? Especially when it’s set in one of Buenos Aires top 5-star hotels, the Faena Hotel.

All of these New Year’s Eve Tango celebrations don’t simply end once the last tango performer leaves the stage: far from it. Each tango house has a programme lined up, with champagne toasts when the clocks strike twelve and parties, with live DJs, that go on until the small hours of the morning.

10-2Madero Tango offers 5-star quality / Image Source

So, does bringing in 2017 in Buenos Aires with a tango show sound good to you? We hope this guide to New Year in Buenos Aires has given you added excitement. However, you need to book soon! These popular New Year’s Eve tango nights sell out fast. Don’t risk missing out on all the fun!

If you’re interested in booking a New Year’s tango show in Buenos Aires, have a look at our online catalogue here and book conveniently and securely with us. Don’t hesitate to contact us either, if you require any more advice or info on what to do in Buenos Aires over New Year’s.

By: Daytours4u Content Team

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What to do During Semana Santa in Buenos Aires http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/what-to-do-during-semana-santa-in-buenos-aires/ Tue, 22 Mar 2016 10:50:00 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/2012/03/how-to-spend-semana-santa-in-buenos-aires.html Semana Santa, or Holy Week, takes place the week before Easter and includes the religious holidays of Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. Traditions and celebrations vary from country to country in South America, but the general trend is plenty of processions, parties and activities. While many Porteños take the opportunity to get out of the city for the [...]

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Semana Santa, or Holy Week, takes place the week before Easter and includes the religious holidays of Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. Traditions and celebrations vary from country to country in South America, but the general trend is plenty of processions, parties and activities.

While many Porteños take the opportunity to get out of the city for the long weekend, there is still plenty going on in Buenos Aires. One example is an annual procession, usually on Good Friday, starting in Congreso Plaza, that heads down Avenida De Mayo and ends in Plaza de Mayo. If you’re going to be spending Semana Santa in Buenos Aires, here are some more ideas for what to do over the Easter holiday.

The Metropolitan Cathedral of Buenos Aires will host services on Easter Sunday / Source

The Metropolitan Cathedral of Buenos Aires will host services on Easter Sunday / Source

Top 3 places to visit in and around Buenos Aires:

There are a great number of activities and things to do in Buenos Aires. Here is our choice of the top 3 places to visit during Semana Santa:

1. Tierra Santa

Visit Tierra Santa this Easter and travel back in time as you wander through this unique and rather surreal theme park, where you will become part of religious history – walk along the streets of Jerusalem, passing typical handicraft shops and traditional food stalls as the music of this bygone era plays in the background. Open on Saturdays, Sundays, and Public Holidays from 12pm to 8pm. Entry prices are AR$55 (children aged between 3 and 11) and AR$130 for adults. The park is located on Av. Costanera Rafael Obligado 5790, just past the Aeroparque Jorge Newberry airport.

The biblical theme park, Tierra Santa

Tierra Santa is a religious theme park located in the heart of the city / Source

2. Lujan

Lujan, known as the Capital of Faith, is a town situated outside the city of Buenos Aires and makes for a wonderful break from the hustle and bustle of Buenos Aires. Take a day trip to Lujan and enjoy the wonderful local zoo where you can get up close and personal with all the animals, and walk around the city where you’ll find Lujan’s famous Cathedral: Lujan Basilica, a large neo-gothic building of outstanding splendour.

Lujan Basilica is a fabulous example of neo-gothic architecture / Source

Lujan Basilica is a fabulous example of neo-gothic architecture / Source

3. Tigre

If you want to relax and unwind surrounded by the beauty of nature, the small city of Tigre offers everything you want. Explore the quaint fruit market, discover the stunning Delta’s abundant flora and fauna with a canal cruise, or simply stroll along the banks of the Paraná River with an ice cream in hand. Choose from our varying Tigre Day Tours and enjoy a tranquil city break.

Boats sailing on the Rio de la Plata

Explore the wonders of Tigre by boat / Credit: Daytours4u

Where to eat during Semana Santa in Buenos Aires:

Traditionally, during the holy days of Semana Santa in Buenos Aires, people refrain from eating asado and instead choose to eat fish. In a beef-loving city, finding a fish menu can be quite difficult, however, much to a Porteño’s surprise, fish restaurants do exist in Buenos Aires. Here are our top 3 fish restaurants:

1. Puerto Cristal

With a special Easter menu including lobster, mussels and rainbow trout, treat yourself to the succulent flavours of fish and accompany it with a fine glass of champagne for the perfect evening in the elegant docklands of Puerto Madero.

2. Crizia 

The restaurant has an impressive menu with seared red tuna with lime vinaigrette and an oyster bar, just to name a couple of the most popular dishes in this modern and elegant Mediterranean restaurant in the chic area of Palermo.

3. Osaka

An interesting mix of Peruvian and Oriental food, this restaurant is for the more adventurous palates. The contemporary, yet relaxed restaurant has some of the finest sushi in Buenos Aires and is also located in the cool and elegant neighbourhood of Palermo.

Puerto Cristal restaurant in the elegant neighbourhood of Puerto Madero / Source

Puerto Cristal restaurant in the elegant neighbourhood of Puerto Madero / Source

Sweet like chocolate… the top 3 places to buy your Easter eggs:

Easter wouldn’t be the same without the excitement of eating and receiving Easter eggs. Kiosks and many bakeries do not sell Easter eggs during Semana Santa in Buenos Aires. Do not worry though, as some of the tastiest and sweetest Easter eggs can be found at the following top 3 places in Buenos Aires:

1. Compañia de Chocolates

A boutique chocolate shop located in Palermo and Recoleta; it sells the richest and most delicious milk chocolate (35% cocoa); dark chocolate (65% cocoa) and white chocolate (32% cocoa) Easter eggs.

2. Persicco

One of the best ice-cream joints in Buenos Aires gets into the Easter spirit by selling delicious chocolate Easter eggs to extremely pleased customers. Click here to find your nearest Persicco in Buenos Aires!

3. Bonafide

This charming coffee shop has a range of Easter eggs for you to enjoy. From the classic milk chocolate, to bitter mint chocolate and chocolate almond – there are Easter egg flavours aplenty here.

Chocolate easter egg

Don’t forget to buy Easter Eggs!

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Regardless of your faith or religion, visiting Buenos Aires during Semana Santa promises to be a wonderful experience. Discover this city of culture and sophistication in the hands of bsas4u.

Book your Buenos Aires tours and activities here

By Daytours4u Content Team

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Humahuaca Carnival: A Festival of Traditions and Rituals http://www.daytours4u.com/en/argentina4u/humahuaca-carnival-festival-of-traditions-and-rituals/ Mon, 25 Jan 2016 08:00:30 +0000 http://daytours4u.com/en/?p=9018 Humahuaca Carnival is a celebration of pagan rituals practiced a century ago. We present a rundown of the festival's history, traditions, and cultures.

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High up in the northern Argentinian Andes, the Quebrada de Humahuaca Carnival is about to kick off. This region in Jujuy province is marked by ancient traditions and a strong culture linked to land and fertility, and so too, is this carnival celebration born from inherited pagan rituals practiced by indigenous tribes.

The carnival runs for nine consecutive days and begins with crowds of revelers walking through the hills to find and dig up the pujllay, or little devil, that was buried the previous year. Groups of singers and musicians (comparsas) will start dancing to the beat of popular music and the locals emerge in the streets of Humahuaca to join the party.

Humahuaca Carnival brings the locals out into the streets / Image Source

TRADITIONS OF HUMAHUACA CARNIVAL

In every comparsa, you will find performers with trombones, saxophones, bass drums, and such native instruments as the charangos. Each group has its own distinct identity and it is common for villagers to invite the musicians into their home for a refreshment. The women customarily dress in gypsy attire while the men don devil costumes and together they douse each other in flour and carry basil leaves – considered an aphrodisiac – filling the air with an unmistakable aroma.

To conclude the ceremonies, the pujllay is buried once again with offerings of alcohol and cocoa, and at nightfall, the rhythm of carnival continues as everyone dances around a campfire before meeting at different points in town, named fortín, to resume the revelry until dawn.

Learn more about the programming of the Quebrada de Humahuaca Carnival here.


TIPS FOR ATTENDING THE QUEBRADA DE HUMAHUACA CARNIVAL

This is not your typical city Carnival. You will not find 5-star hotels here and the infrastructure around town is not great. Embrace the less sophisticated atmosphere.

Be prepared for one big party. The locals do not offer a separate tourist celebration, instead putting all their efforts into traditions, songs, dancing, and rituals that have been practiced for centuries.

It is the perfect experience for adventure lovers, backpack travellers, anthropologists, sociologists, and anybody with a curious nature.

As this is a time for partying, there is no guarantee that other activities will be available – not all tourist services will be operational. Enquire in advance to be sure.

The Mountain of Seven Colours in the small town of Purmamarca / Photograph by Luiza Cavalcante

WHAT TO DO IN QUEBRADA DE HUMAHUACA

Experiencing Quebrada de Humahuaca Carnival is a truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and in addition to the festival, you can also explore the spectacular nearby scenery. Visit the small towns and villages that carry traditional Andean cultures and soak in the stunning desert landscapes:

In Purmamarca you can see the striking Cerro de los Siete Colores (Mountain of Seven Colours), which is in close proximity to the central town square and a local handicraft market.

Journey to Tilcara, a town host to the Ruins of the Pucará de Tilcara: breathtaking landscapes of cacti and Incan ruins are waiting. The Garganta del Diablo is another must-see for those who love hiking and adventure, and further geological wonders in the area include Cerro de la Pollera Coya, Volcán Yacoirate and Falda de los Hongos.

Whilst in town, you should sample the delicious and exotic regional delicacies: llama meat (used in empanadas), tamal (a dish made of masa steamed in a corn husk or banana leaf), and chatasca (dried beef stew with peanuts and potatoes).

If you are up in the city of Salta, take a tour to Quebrada de Humahuaca and see the main attractions in just one day.

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If you are visiting Latin America for carnival this summer, we can help you enrich your travel experiences. Check out our tours and activities in Rio de Janeiro, São PauloChile, Colombia, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, and across Argentina.

By Luiza Cavalcante Edited by Simon Hall

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Get Ready for a Month of Murgas at Buenos Aires Carnival http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/get-ready-for-month-of-murgas-buenos-aires-carnival/ Tue, 19 Jan 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/2011/02/the-rhythm-of-buenos-aires-carnaval-2011.html Enjoy the sights and sounds of the vibrant Buenos Aires Carnival. Read this guide for how to best experience the celebrations in Argentina's capital.

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It’s January and the summer is sizzling, but there is something else in the air; the streets are seemingly exploding into scenes of fantastical costumes, rhythmic music, exotic dance, parades and celebration. Yes, we are talking about Buenos Aires Carnival.

buenos aires carnivalThe colourful Murgas of Carnival in Buenos Aires / Image Source

Each weekend during the months of February, the city of Buenos Aires will be hosting its very own fabulous Carnival with delights and traditions for all to behold. Approximately 17,000 street musicians and artists, over 100 ‘Murgas’ (Carnaval bands), plus more than 1,000 drum and percussion instruments will be joyfully storming the streets of various neighbourhoods in order to showcase their best artistic talents.

During the celebrations of the Porteño Carnival, you may be alarmed to find yourself face-to-face with ‘gangs’ that go by the name of ‘The Vicious of Almagro’, ‘The Crazies of Spinetto’ or the ‘The Hobos of La Boca’ but don’t cower under the duvet just yet. These are names of the constituents that are, in fact, a cultural heritage and some of the most famous neighbourhood Murga groups here in Buenos Aires; the epitome of Carnival in Buenos Aires and a sight that cannot be missed!

Murga is a typical, time-honoured cultural expression from Argentina and Uruguay. Essentially it is an assemblage of percussionists, dancers and fantasies, with the occasional flamethrower, juggler and stilt dancer thrown in for good measure. However, Buenos Aires distinguishes itself from the rest of the country, as each performance will represent a certain ‘barrio’ (neighbourhood). The rhythm of one provincial street band will be distinct from the next, by the origins of various urban folk custom, tempo and arrangement, not to mention the exciting, colourful costumes. All are united by the use of lyrics, known as ‘criticas’ that cleverly combine social rebuking with humour and dancing. So if you are in Buenos Aires during these cultural Carnaval festivities, be sure to discover the new areas of the city through the heart and rhythm of its people!

One word of warning: due to the summer heat, the celebrations are notoriously associated with water…generally in the form of ‘bombitas’ or as we know them, water bombs. Keep a watchful eye out for mischievous children awaiting their next victim, or find your inner child, grab a Rey Momo, a handful of balloons, and join in the fun. For dates, times and locations check the official website of the government of Buenos Aires. Click here for details.

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If you are visiting South America for carnival this summer, we can help you enrich your travel experiences. Check out our tours and activities in Rio de Janeiro, São PauloChile, Colombia, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, and across Argentina.

Edited by Simon Hall

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Where to Celebrate Buenos Aires Carnival http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/where-to-celebrate-buenos-aires-carnival/ Tue, 12 Jan 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/2013/01/carnival-in-buenos-aires.html Buenos Aires Carnival is just around the corner and here we present a rundown of where to go to enjoy the spectacular celebrations.

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February is the time of year when South America comes alive with the contagious rhythm and dancing of Carnival. While Argentina’s neighbour, Brazil, is home to the world’s most famous carnival, Argentina has its very own version – on a smaller, but no less enthusiastic scale. The streets of Buenos Aires come alive every weekend in February, and although it isn’t quite as extravagant as Rio de Janeiro’s feather and sequin-wearing samba antics, it’s still a great event to take part in if you’re travelling to Buenos Aires.

Buenos Aires CarnivalThe parades go on until the small hours of the morning / Image Source

How does Carnival in Buenos Aires work?

Carnaval Porteño consists of Corsos, or street parades, with neighbourhood communities coming together to present spectacular Murgas: groups of dancers and drummers parading in extravagant attire. With bright colours and naturally the odd sequin here and there, Carnival in Buenos Aires has more of a circus influence, and it feels more similar to European carnival equivalents. But this is South America, so everything comes with a touch more excitement and passion!

Starting in early February, you’ll find many streets throughout the capital cordoned off at weekends to give way to Buenos Aires’ Carnival parties. The main celebrations begin on the official Carnival weekend, a public holiday in Argentina.

When will 2017 Buenos Aires Carnival take place?

Here’s a list of the most popular Corsos or Carnival parades in Buenos Aires that take place in the most accessible and popular areas of the city throughout late January and February. So, find the one nearest to you and don’t miss it! The parades all start at 19.00 and run through the small hours of the morning.

Dates: 4th, 5th, 11th, 12th, 18th, 19th, 25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th February.

Hours: Saturdays – from 19.00 to 02.00; Sundays and Holidays – 19.00 to 24.00

Buenos Aires CarnivalBuenos Aires Carnival is comprised of Murgas, Corsos, and a whole lot of revelry / Image Source

Neighbourhoods and streets

Abasto: Plaza Monseñor Miguel de Andrea

Almagro: Av. Corrientes between Bulnes and Medrano; Anfiteatro Parque Centenario

Balvanera: Av. Belgrano between Saavedra and Matheu

Barracas: Herrera between Quinquela Martin and California

Boedo: Av. Boedo between Independencia and San Juan

Coghlan: Av. Congreso between Donado and Lugones

La Boca: Benito Perez Galdos between Necochea and Pedro de Mendoza

Palermo: Darwin between Cabrera and Gorriti; Scalabrini Ortiz and Soler

San Telmo: Av. Independencia between Bolivar and Chacabuco

Villa Crespo: Scalabrini Ortiz between Corrientes and Padilla

A top tip: make sure you wear clothing you don’t mind getting wet, as water bombs are everywhere during carnival. And watch out for kids with spray cans of foam, as squirting any passer-by with foam is all part of the fun.

If you’re looking for more information on Carnival in Argentina, have a look at our post about Argentina’s biggest Carnival celebration in Gualeguaychu.

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If you are visiting South America for carnival this summer, we can help you enrich your travel experiences. Check out our tours and activities in Rio de Janeiro, São PauloChile, Colombia, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, and across Argentina.

By Nicole Eberhard

The post Where to Celebrate Buenos Aires Carnival appeared first on Daytours4u.

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Gualeguaychú Carnival is Argentina’s Best-Kept Secret http://www.daytours4u.com/en/argentina4u/gualeguaychu-carnival-argentinas-best-kept-secret/ Sun, 10 Jan 2016 08:00:14 +0000 http://argentina4u.com/blog/en/?p=1876 Gualeguaychú Carnival is Argentina’s biggest and most extravagant celebration of the year. Get insider tips on how to join the revelry here.

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If you’re visiting Argentina this summer and want the carnival experience, Gualeguaychú is undoubtedly the place to go. Every year, this small town in the eastern reaches of the country dedicates the months of January and February to carnival, putting on a host of extravagant festivities that are considered to be the best in the world alongside the celebrations in Rio de Janeiro. Discover more about Argentina’s premier carnival, and ensure that you’re fully prepared with this handy guide.

Gualeguaychú CarnivalExperience Carnival in Argentina this year / Image Source

EXPERIENCING CARNIVAL IN ARGENTINA

The carnival in Gualeguaychú takes place every weekend throughout the first two months of the year, with February being the most eventful month, and therefore, the recommended time to go. The carnival parades during this time feature different dance schools known as comparsas, who compete against each other, showing off their flawless dance routines, colourful costumes, and grand float displays. Tens of thousands of people from Argentina and abroad come to watch the shows, which are held in the corsódromo, a five-hundred-metre long arena purpose-built for the event.

Gualeguaychú Carnival Guide

As so many people come to participate in the carnival celebrations, we’d advise you to make sure you’re fully prepared ahead of the event by purchasing tickets and organising transportation and accommodation well in advance. You can buy your carnival tickets online or at the ticket office inside the corsódromo, which is open from 9am – 9pm Monday to Friday, and until 7pm on Saturdays.

Gualeguaychú CarnivalExpect to see a lot of feathers, costumes, and dancing during the Carnival parades / Image Source

Getting to Gualeguaychú

Gualeguaychú is 225km from the city of Buenos Aires and the journey takes approximately three hours by bus or two and a half hours in a car. Buses depart from Retiro bus station roughly every half an hour and tickets can either be bought at the station or over the phone with a credit card. Be sure to leave plenty of time if this is your only option for travel, or else you may find yourself stranded in Buenos Aires with no means of getting to the carnival.

Accommodation in Gualeguaychú

During carnival, you can choose to stay in an all-inclusive hotel, hostel, or campsite. Those that camp tend to be looking for full-blown Gualeguaychú Carnival debauchery, whereas those who wish to be a bit more removed from the madness should opt for something outside of the city, such as an estancia. Again, it is essential to book in advance, particularly if you want to stay in one of the more popular hotels or hostels.

After a night of carnival parades and parties, relax by the river / Image Source

Other Things to do in Gualeguaychú

During your stay in Gualeguaychú, you should take advantage of the other tourist attractions the city has to offer, such as the many beautiful beaches and the Gualeguaychú hot springs located a mile outside of the city. Gualeguaychú also has historical areas that are worth visiting, namely San Martín Square, Urquiza Square, San José Cathedral, and numerous cultural sites which include the Railway Museum, Andrade’s House and Fray Mocho’s House.

Our final bit of advice would be to make sure you arrive at the carnival well-rested, for the festivities run late into the night and you don’t want to tire yourself out too early on!

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If you are visiting South America for carnival this summer, we can help you enrich your travel experiences. Check out our tours and activities in Rio de Janeiro, São PauloChile, Colombia, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, and across Argentina.

By Camilla Day

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Uruguay Carnival Celebrations Deeply Influenced by African Traditions http://www.daytours4u.com/en/uruguay4u/uruguay-carnival-celebrations-african-traditions/ Wed, 06 Jan 2016 08:00:31 +0000 http://daytours4u.com/en/?p=8856 Carnival celebrations in South America are traditionally associated with Rio de Janeiro, Carnaval Porteño in Buenos Aires, and Carnaval de Barranquilla in Colombia. The festivities at this time of year in the continent’s smallest country, Uruguay, may be less renowned, yet they remain equally vibrant, colourful, and dazzlingly expressive. While Uruguay Carnival is indeed a [...]

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Carnival celebrations in South America are traditionally associated with Rio de Janeiro, Carnaval Porteño in Buenos Aires, and Carnaval de Barranquilla in Colombia. The festivities at this time of year in the continent’s smallest country, Uruguay, may be less renowned, yet they remain equally vibrant, colourful, and dazzlingly expressive. While Uruguay Carnival is indeed a countrywide affair, the main revelry takes place in the capital: Montevideo. Thousands get into costume and grace the streets, local and international dancers gyrate in sequined attire, bonfires glimmer in the night air, and drums beat out the thunderous African rhythm known as “candombe” – this annual party brings unrelenting joy to the city.

Uruguay Carnival is a vibrant and expressive affair / Image Source

The history of Uruguay Carnival is rooted in the country’s African culture that first emerged in the mid-1700’s when Montevideo was a major trade port for ships bringing African slaves to the Rio de la Plata region. Despite coming from the same lands, the slaves belonged to myriad ethnic groups and together lacked a common identity. They yearned for their musical heritage, religious practices, old habits, and faraway homelands. Before Uruguay abolished slavery, these men and women would congregate in houses located in poor neighbourhoods and reminisce about their origins through song and dance. Certain masters would also allow their workers to hold extravagant parties in which they could celebrate their African ancestry.

The festivities grew in popularity and once the slaves’ freedom was granted, the African communities began throwing ever more spectacular events in impoverished districts, most prominently Sur and Palermo. The unique candombe sounds – acknowledged by UNESCO as a World Cultural Heritage of humanity – were used to gather people together, giving birth to Las Llamadas (The Calls) which are an important aspect of Carnival today.

Contemporary glitz and glamour in Montevideo to celebrate together the diversity / Image Source

The modern phenomenon of Uruguay Carnival began back in 1956, and it has, ever since, become a highlight on the Uruguayan cultural calendar. In more recent times, Uruguay Carnival has been garnering attention on the international stage thanks largely to the distinct style of candombe. This recognition has given fresh momentum to the country’s burgeoning black cultural movement and it has also raised awareness about the history of Afro-Uruguayans: present-day Carnival in Uruguay is helping to build bridges.

Much of the contemporary glitz and glamour on display pays homage to the African slave communities of a bygone era – the outfits, makeup and music provide subtle references to stories of repression; white men decorate themselves with black face paint; and white women don traditional African apparel. The ethnic and social classes unite to light up cosmopolitan Montevideo for 40 simply spectacular days and nights.

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If you are visiting South America for carnival this summer, we can help you enrich your travel experiences. Check out our tours and activities in Rio de Janeiro, São PauloChile, Colombia, Uruguay, Buenos Aires, and across Argentina.

By Simon Hall

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Carnival in Buenos Aires: What you need to know http://www.daytours4u.com/en/bsas4u/carnival-in-buenos-aires-what-you-need-know/ Tue, 05 Jan 2016 08:00:20 +0000 http://bsas4u.com/blog/en/?p=2866 Rio de Janeiro might be the most famous destination when it comes to Carnival, but Argentina should not be overlooked. While the largest carnival in the country takes place in Gualeguaychú, if you’re planning on being in Buenos Aires, don’t miss out on the spectacular Carnaval Porteño! Carnival in Buenos Aires may not be as extravagant [...]

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Rio de Janeiro might be the most famous destination when it comes to Carnival, but Argentina should not be overlooked. While the largest carnival in the country takes place in Gualeguaychú, if you’re planning on being in Buenos Aires, don’t miss out on the spectacular Carnaval Porteño!

Carnival in Buenos Aires may not be as extravagant as those hosted in the North, yet it is still a glitzy party with its own distinct flavours and traditions. The main festivities take place over the official Carnival long weekend, with two days of public holidays. Prepare for a long weekend of parades and parties!

Carnival in Buenos Aires / source

Carnival in Buenos Aires / Source

History of Carnaval Porteño

Argentina’s Carnival grew at the close of the 18th century, around the same time as the tango. With similar working class roots, Carnaval Porteño adopted the murga style as a way to express dissatisfaction with the situation of the country and to make fun of those in power. There was a distinct ethnic element to murgas initially, with that of the African slaves differing from the murgas of European immigrants. Eventually, the murgas came to represent neighbourhoods rather than ethnic or religious groups. It became a popular part of the Argentine calendar until the military government of the 1970s stopped the celebrations. With the return to democracy came a carnival revival and the Buenos Aires Carnival has become a popular celebration once again.

A girl performing during Carnival in Buenos Aires

Carnival in Buenos Aires has its own style / Source

What is a Murga?

Murga is a percussion-based rhythm performed by a marching band on the streets, with an acrobatic dance to match. The lyrics of the songs are referred to as ‘criticas’, as they combine social criticism with humour, frequently targeting corrupt politicians. The Murga Porteña can be defined by dancers (also called murgueros) in colourful, shiny costumes with gloves, a top hat and stick, all symbols of aristocracy from colonial times. This is very different to the carnival costumes worn in Brazil, and even in Gualeguaychú and the Andean communities of Northern Argentina.

Murga outfits | Carnival in Buenos Aires

Typical outfits worn by the murgueros are colourful and shiny. / Source

Carnival today

Today, the carnival parties and festivities in Buenos Aires consist of murga parades hosted across the city. Because Murgas are connected to each individual neighbourhood, they take place in their barrios. Murgas include Los Amantes de la Boca (The Lovers of La Boca), Los Viciouso de Almagro (The Vicious of Almagro), Los Fantoches de Villa Urquiza (The Loud-Mouths of Villa Urquiza) and Los Chiflados de Boedo (the Crazies of Boedo). The parades include bands and dancers often accompanied by murga singers. While the main parade takes place along Avenida de Mayo, the neighbourhood corsos are closer to block parties than official parades.

Keep an eye out on the website for Carnival in Buenos Aires for when and where each parade takes place. All parades are free of charge.

Foam Fight | Carnival in Buenos Aires 2015

Foam fights are all part of the fun! / Source

Carnival in Buenos Aires is a lot of fun. As it is lesser known and spread out across the city, the crowds are much more manageable than the more famous Carnivals, making for a more pleasant experience. And like Carnival elsewhere, the party spirit is infectious. After dancing along to the murga beats, head out to the city’s boliches (clubs) to keep the party going.

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By Nicole Eberhard

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